Home Cosmetic Surgery General The Ricki Lake show  Plastic surgery & Medical tourism

The Ricki Lake show  Plastic surgery & Medical tourism

The Ricki Lake Show“The Ricki Lake Show” devoted an hour in January to extreme plastic surgery and medical tourism. Several patients shared horror stories about procedures gone wrong – and performed by non- qualified practitioners. ASPS member Ashkan Ghavami, MD, was the plastic surgery expert on the show and provided advice for anyone considering plastic surgery. Lake left viewers with some parting advice at the end of the show: “When it comes to plastic surgery, remember knowledge is power. If you are considering going under the knife, do your research, find a board-certified plastic surgeon and ask the hard questions.”

“This is a very important show, because safety is so important and you don’t want to bargain-shop for your plastic surgery. This is your body you’re talking about – it’s a temple. Being certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery is like a car having wheels. It’s the basics.”

Here at the Cosmetic and Restorative Surgery Clinic we have the same opinion of RickiLake and Dr Ghavami that it is important to firstly be educated and in this belief we have built a comprehensive and well informed website www.cosmeticsurgeryoz.com that provides a wealth of information on cosmetic procedures that we offer. Secondly we offer a world of experience, 30 years to be exact in Dr Hodgkinson who like Dr Ghavami is also accredited by the American Board of Plastic surgery. Read below an exerpt that Dr Hodgkinson has written on his recent trip to Chile to the 17th IPRAS Meeting where the topic of medical tourism was discussed between the world’s best plastic surgeons.

“The topic of Medical Tourism was obviously one which had much appeal to such an international audience. Dr Michael McGuire, past president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS – U.S.A.) pointed out that there were considerable risks to be appreciated by patients who contemplate overseas surgery. Long plane trips predispose patients to thromboembolism (clots). When a patient arrives in a foreign country, there is a time difference, disorientation, language difference and often food discrepancies. On meeting the plastic surgeon for the first time, there is no way to establish a proper relationship prior to the surgery and the relationship is purely technical with little recognition of the psychological component implied in all cosmetic surgical procedures.

The ability of the nurses and anaesthetists is unknown and their training and procedures are likely to be different from what we expect in Australia. Infections which may occur could be from organisms that are uncommon in Australia and if a problem occurs when a patient returns home, there is little recourse and the local plastic surgeons are unlikely to want to become involved in those kinds of problems. Facilities in other nations are often not licensed and accredited as they are in Australia, although in Australia, there are still many that are not accredited. Costs are mainly hidden as patients need to have an accompanying person with them and follow up if needed, will require another overseas trip, airline flights and time off work.

The thrill of a cheap procedure will be much more transient than the long-term anguish of a poor result. Although the unbelievable savings seem to be a “draw card” to patients initially, the lack of follow up is distressing in the long-term for patients and plastic surgeons alike. Especially with breast implants, the need to deal with problems in the future, is trivialized by the over enthusiastic surgical broker whose incentive is purely a commercial one.” Click Here.